Compare and contrast wanderer and seafarer

These similarities are no coincidence and they tie these two poems together. For example, the use of Christian elements and Pagan elements, the speaker, and the reason for a nomadic lifestyle. In "The Seafarer," we find a very similar opening in which the narrator declares himself to be telling "a true song about me, myself" and the struggles he has endured, which circle around "the terrible tossing of the waves.

One of the similarities between the Wanderer and the Seafarer is the separation of the protagonists from their comitatus and exile from their society. This would be far from the only poem in the Anglo-Saxon canon to cast Christ in the guise of the traditional Lord or hero compare "The Dream of the Rood".

At the end of both poems there is an addendum by the Christian monks in an attempt to influence the Anglo-Saxons at the time. Another one of the similarities between The Wanderer and the Seafarer are the many physical adversities that the two protagonists face during their exile.

In The Seafarer, the speaker is a Christian who absolutely loves One theme that should stand out to the reader in the the two poems is the interest in spiritual matters that the two main characters find after going through a series of unfortunate events.

He prefers it to the life of ease and physical comforts that living on land provides. It is very much like a prayer to the Lord as he finishes with "Amen". It is good to find your grace Like the Wife, too, the seafarer feels that the joys of the Lord probably Jesus, but potentially also referring to his sire are in stark contrast to the misery of his earthly life.

In The Seafarer, the speaker is a Christian who absolutely loves the sea. The Wanderer is also an exile because the members of the society do not accept him when they realize what he did to his comitatus.

He can not think of anything else, even though it is not an easy or comfortable life.

The Wanderer and the Seafarer, the protagonists, are both exiled from their society. He roams the land looking for some friendly face to take him in where he may find comfort in human companionship. You would probably understand this longing if you compared it to something you enjoy doing that would effect you negatively should you not be allowed to enjoy it any more--sports, music, shopping, or surfing the internet might be among the pasttimes you enjoy most.

The physical hardships that the two main characters go through is another notable resemblance between the two poems.

How would you write a compare and contrast essay on

Who the "Wife" may be, after all, we do not know. The theme of the outcast, someone who is now alone and outcast from his or her society, forms the basis for all three poems, with the alliterative language across the poems revisiting similar concerns such as "mod" mind, or mindset and "wyrd" fate.

The sea is ingrained in him, and he longs to be on the water when he is not. Or is the poem, perhaps, about a personification of the Church, with the "Lord" in question "resurrected, departed from his people" being Jesus Christ?

These are ideals that Anglo-Saxons would not have or write about. The exile of the two main characters is one striking similarity between the two poems.

Decide on three or four aspects that you could compare and contrast. Proponents of the riddle theory have pointed to the reference to the wife dwelling "under an oak tree in this earth grave" In The Wanderer, the speaker has lost his home, family, friends, and the generosity of his king.

These three poems are some of the better-known examples of Old English elegiac poetry. In the second part of the poem, the speaker gives advice about how to live life.

Compare and contrast the poems the

During this time all the members of his comitatus die leaving him to be the only survivor of his comitatus. During the separation of the protagonists from their comitatus and their exile from their society, they experience a series of physical adversities. Another motif that is worthy of mention in the two poems ,is the addendum at the end of the two works planted by the Christian monks at the time.

Another way that we know that these poems were tampered with is that the monks wrote g in the upper case, another thing an Anglo-Saxon poet would not do. Is the Wife dead and consigned somehow to her earthly grave while her husband is separated from her? The Wanderer is separated from his comitatus because he escapes from a war and leaves them.Get an answer for 'How would you write a compare and contrast essay on "The Seafarer" and "The Wanderer"?' and find homework help for other The Seafarer questions at eNotes.

The Wanderer Vs. The Seafarer-Nick Wajda, Danilo Rubio, Brandi Whitaker & Paige Seay Compare and Contrast The Seafarer was put out to sea, whereas the Wanderer has lost his lord. This results in The Wanderer searching for a new lord.

The Seafarer kindles a new fire for life. In contrast, The Wanderer feels sadness. Cultural. The Seafarer's theme is the struggle between home and the road, whereas the theme of the Wanderer is that of silent suffering.

Throughout the entire length of the Seafarer, there is a constant struggle between the author's desire to face the elements, to battle nature, to feel the spray of mist on his face, "My.

Get an answer for 'Compare and contrast the poems the "Wife's Lament," "The Wanderer," and "The Seafarer."' and find homework help for other The Seafarer questions at. Compare and Contrast "The Seafarer" and "The Wanderer" In both poems, the characters have been exiled.

"The Seafarer" character was put to the Sea. Sep 07,  · One of the similarities between the Wanderer and the Seafarer is the separation of the protagonists from their comitatus and exile from their society.

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Compare and contrast wanderer and seafarer
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